Under the Bower

Word of the Week Noted in NashvilleBower – 1.  An attractive dwelling or retreat. 2.  A lady’s private apartment in a medieval hall or castle, 3.  a shelter (as in a garden) made with tree boughs or vines twined together:  arbor.

Bower:  Merriam-Webster.  Definitions retrieved June 25, 2012, from: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bower

Come To The Greenwood Tree

Come to the greenwood tree,
Come where the dark woods be,
Dearest, O come with me!
Let us rove—O my love—O my love!

Come—’tis the moonlight hour,
Dew is on leaf and flower,
Come to the linden bower,—
Let us rove—O my love—O my love!

Dark is the wood, and wide
Dangers, they say, betide;
But, at my Albert’s side,
Nought I fear, O my love—O my love!

Welcome the greenwood tree,
Welcome the forest free,
Dearest, with thee, with thee,
Nought I fear, O my love—O my love!

William Makepeace Thackeray (1811 – 1863)

 Word of the Week Noted in Nashville

Noted in Nashville HeadshotI could set these words to music right now.  They’re as lovely as the author’s name.  Bower is not an unfamiliar word, but scarcely used; and its varying definitions give this poem depth of meaning.  Below is my clumsy attempt at using it.

Emily’s childhood nestled under the bower of her parents’ union.  Certain of the antipathy society would have for their precious girl; they kept Emily hidden with them in the country.  This decision allowed them a happy, but limited number of days together – 2,167 exactly.

– Anita, Noted in Nashville

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