Jingles All the Way

Jingles All the WayFew things have quite the lasting impression as commercial jingles. 

Quick, recite the Preamble to the Constitution. . .  Now without Googling them, name the books of the Old Testament in order. . .  Okay, how far can you get in the periodic table of elements?  Would an earworm help?

How did you do?  Probably better than I.  But I’ll bet all of us can ace the “Slinky Song.”  Everyone 35 and older can probably sing the “My Buddy” jingle by heart.  And do any of us even remember that “Like a Rock” actually played on the radio before it sold Chevy trucks?

Nowadays, a new pop or country song makes its way to a national commercial before it even hits the radio.  Keeping up with today’s music is as easy as watching prime time television.  What used to be considered a song’s last stop, its last chance for resuscitation, its performer’s walk of Shame, I Need the Money, is now its debu-taint ball, its informal presentation of new money to impolite society.  (Don’t mind her, she’s just jealous.)

You’ve read the news, “It Takes an Earworm to Learn the Periodic Table.”  Maybe a jingle is nothing more than a glorified earworm.  But did you notice, the tune used as an aid to learn the periodic table is from The Pirates of Penzance?  Gilbert and Sullivan – the team celebrated at any given Ivy League school – have been reduced to earworm status.

Want to learn the elements in order?  Try using Offenbach’s can-can music “Infernal Galop.”  He’s been reduced too.

To tell the truth, I have an affection and respect for good jingle writers.  I tip my hat to the writer(s) of the Empire Today commercial jingle.  When I have the funds together, not only will I be able to call for an estimate on replacing my floors without cracking open a phone book (yes, I have one) or waking up my computer, but I’ll be able to do it in three-part harmony.  And you know what a sucker I am for harmony.

No sir, a glorified earworm a jingle is not.  A good song is a good song.  Whether or not you have any experience with roasting a chestnut over an open fire, when the great Nat King Cole sings the first line of that song you see the glow, you hear the crackle, you feel Christmas.  Whether or not you’ve ever been to a cabaret, when you hear Offenbach’s “Can-Can” you see high kicks, petticoats, and perhaps the periodic table.  And right or wrong, when I hear “I’d like to teach the world to sing in perfect harmony,” I taste a cold Coke – from a bottle of course – and I feel hopeful that not only will that bottle be recycled, but maybe we will all metaphorically sing in harmony one day.  And hey, if it turns out to be literal I won’t be disappointed.

Using art to sell stuff may be the world’s actual oldest profession.  After all, it was the music of a piano player or player piano that first lured a customer to a brothel.  (I’ll bet Offenbach’s music was featured there too.)  Before pianos, they probably just whistled or banged rocks together.  The bottom line is that a good product needs a good song.  But a good song does not necessarily need the product.

This Christmas there are several jingles that I feel could stand alone – even without the product to which they’ve been attached.

GLADE:  “Let There Be Peace on Earth”

This song by Kevin Ross is a beauty, as is his voice.  Searching for it on iTunes after I’m done with this post. . .

Vistaprint:  “I Just Wanted You to Know”

Here’s the full version of David Law’s song.  The holidays do seem to be the perfect time to tell people how much they mean to you.

Big Lots:  “Nailing This”

I don’t know who sings this but – you guessed it – she nails it!  Just try to keep me from singing this into a hairbrush.

Walmart:  “Christmas Cheer”

I’m all in for the “more carols … hugs … spirit … and joy” parts of this song.

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Shutterfly:  “Mail Myself to You”

No more “Dust Bowl Blues” for Woodie Guthrie’s family.  Hearing this little girl sing his song probably makes them verklempt too.

Happy Holidays!

Anita, Noted in Nashville

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Taking a Beat . . . or 2 . . . or 12

Well . . . that was certainly an abrupt break from the blog!  I’m sorry to have left some of your comments hanging, for leaving some blog awards unanswered, and for disappearing from your posts without a word.

Big D and I welcomed some unexpected opportunities and surprising changes.  All good.  But the blog had to take an immediate back seat, and a flight out the proverbial window soon followed – leaving my blogging manners to twist in the spring breeze.

I think of you all often, and I look forward to catching up with all of your blogs in August.  Now . . . it’s time to take that summer break I planned all along.  🙂

Have a great summer!

– Anita, Noted in Nashville

Fear Itself: Awareness, Part III

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Part III Catch up on Fear Itself: Awareness, Part II here. A wise man once told me, “Aware people are happy people.”  I have questioned the authenticity of this pearl from time to time – especially at the height of … Continue reading

Fear Itself: Awareness, Part II

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aware – knowing that something (such as a situation, condition, or problem) exists feeling, experiencing, or noticing something (such as a sound, sensation, or emotion) knowing and understanding a lot about what is happening in the world or around you … Continue reading

Fear Itself: Awareness, Part I

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I wasn’t always afraid to sing or perform in front of others, of course.  Phobias aren’t delivered when we are.  “Congratulations!  It’s a girl . . . with Friggatriskaidekaphobia, Social Anxiety Disorder, and Ablutophobia, so good luck with her first … Continue reading

You Tubular

You Tubular

When You Tube suggested I make a commercial to boost my channel’s ratings, the words “cross promotion” came to mind.  What a brilliant idea they had!  Get more people to view my videos, and lure them over to the blog.  After just a few days of running the commercial, I noticed that my number of You Tube subscribers had jumped up by ten.

And then I got reading glasses.

That number was a little smaller than I originally thought. . .  By nine.

So, the bad news is that my near vision has declined.  But the good news is that my distance vision has improved by a lot since college.  An allegory for life?  Let’s hope so.

 

And with my long-distance visions in mind, I put together a long-overdue demo of my studio work – a vocal sampler like a box of Valentine’s chocolates.  Please let me know if there are any you’d like to spit out.

P.S.  The first song is a sneak peek (or would that be a near hear?) of our new song, coming soon.

– Anita, Noted in Nashville

Fear Itself: The Play of Down

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A couple of weeks ago – which is like, forever in the world of social media – when Russell Wilson was merely a newbie NFC champion, he asked the advice of four-time “The Big Game” winner Terry Bradshaw. “What do … Continue reading

“Fear Itself” Series: My Journey to Overcome Stage Fright

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We were the last to arrive, the last on the list of songwriters, and the last on stage.  I thought that being last was a blessing.  I believed it would allow the tension to escape the room in time for … Continue reading

The Quiet Crunch

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The Quiet Crunch I’ve been a little quiet on the blog lately.  I’m always a little quiet when I’m up to no good. Actually, the reverse is true.  I’m quietest when I’m working on or toward something that matters to … Continue reading